Mor Naaman is an associate professor of Information Science at the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute at Cornell Tech, where he is the founder of the Connective Media hub, and leads a research group focused on social technologies. 

His research applies multidisciplinary methods to 1) gain a better understanding of people and their use of social tech; 2) extract insights about people, technology and society from social media and other sources of social data, and 3) develop new social technologies as well as novel tools to make social data more accessible and usable in various settings.

Previously, Mor was on the faculty at Rutgers SC&I, led a research team at Yahoo! Research Berkeley, received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University, and played professional basketball for Hapoel Tel Aviv. He is a recipient of a NSF Early Faculty CAREER Award, research awards and grants from numerous corporations including AOL and Google, and multiple best paper awards.


Psychological and Social Aspects of Technology

Credits 3.0

This course explores the behavioral foundations of communication technology and the information sciences, and the ways in which theories and methods from the behavioral sciences play a role in understanding people’s use of, access to and interactions with information and communication technologies. Multiple levels of analysis—individual, small group, and larger collectives—will be included, along with multiple disciplinary perspectives. Course topics will include: introduction to behavioral research methods; principles of human perception and cognition; cognitive perspectives on design, attention and memory; emotion/affect; psychological theories of language use and self-presentation in computer-mediated communication; social psychological perspectives on coordination and group work (digital interaction), organizational science theories of social ties and relationships; user motivation, persuasion. Methodological topics will include the design of lab and field experiments, survey studies, and field observations, common statistical techniques used in the behavioral sciences and how to interpret them, and strategies for reporting results from behavioral science studies.