The LLM curriculum will teach you the legal principles and practical business applications you need to support and lead technology companies in the increasingly complex and dynamic digital economy.

You’ll also explore the public policy and legal frameworks that promote or limit innovation, and analyze the institutional, legal and business issues that affect technology-related startups. In an educational innovation unique to Cornell Tech, you'll also participate in an immersive Studio Experience, in which you'll develop your team-building and leadership skills while developing a new product idea in response to the strategic needs of a real organization and create your own startup.

What Your Schedule Might Look Like

In the fall you’ll spend your mornings in classroom-based courses covering the legal aspects of entrepreneurship, venture capital, privacy, cybersecurity and intellectual property. In the afternoons you'll work on team-based projects in Product Studio and Startup Ideas.

In the spring you’ll continue your required classroom coursework and complement it with three electives. In the afternoons you’ll provide legal counsel to your team-members as you pursue projects in Startup Studio.

Required Curriculum 13.50 Credits

Electives 2.00 Credits

Semester Total 15.5 Credits

Required Curriculum 12.50 Credits

Electives 3.00 Credits

Semester Total 15.5 Credits

Program Curriculum

Your core program curriculum.
  • Intellectual Property Law 3.0

    This is a survey course in intellectual property (IP) law. It covers the what, when, who, how, and why of IP: what kinds of information can be protected, when these rights arise, who owns them, how they are enforced, and why the legal system goes to all this trouble. We will perform comparative anatomy on bodies of law including trade secret, patent, copyright, trademark, false advertising, and rights of publicity, dissecting them to understand them on their own terms and in relationship to each other. Students will be able to understand how each field of IP thinks about the world, to identify what kinds of information are and are not covered by different types of IP, and to advise creators, innovators, entrepreneurs, and citizens how to deal with IP assets and threats in a wide variety of technological settings. Although this course is suitable for those who have not previously taken a course in IP, it will not be redundant for those who have. Our goal will be to understand the deep structure of intellectual property law, not to memorize doctrinal details or debate abstract points of legal theory.

  • Technology Transactions I 2.0

    This course is designed to familiarize students with common issues that arise in technology transactions, and how they are addressed by attorneys who structure such transactions. Going beyond the black letter law, it will draw on the expertise of lawyers and law firms with substantial experience in the area who will review the principal transactional documents in detail and describe how they address the principal issues that arise in technology transactions. Although topics may be modified over each semester, a wide range of topics is expected to be covered, including: Formation Issues; Initiating a Technology Transaction; Common Transactions for Early Stage Companies; Patent Prosecution; License Agreements; Technology in M&A Transactions; and Open Source Software. Students who complete this course will have a strong foundational understanding of the principal technology transactions and how they are structured and documented. They will be able to think through the principal legal issues that are likely to arise and formulate strategies in response.

  • High-Growth Corporate Transactions I 2.0

    This course is designed to familiarize students with common issues that arise in startups, and how they are addressed by attorneys who structure high-growth (principally start-up) corporate transactions. It will address that portion of the transactional practice not covered in Technology Transactions. Going beyond the black letter law, it will draw on the expertise of lawyers and law firms with substantial experience in the area who will review the principal transactional documents in detail and how they address the principal issues that arise in high-growth corporate transactions. Although topics may be modified over each semester, a wide range of topics is expected to be covered, including: Choice of Entity; Founders’ Agreement(s); Terms of Preferred Stock, including Liquidation Preferences and Conversion Mechanics; Basic Deal Structuring; Tax Issues/Benefits for Entrepreneurs/Startups; Series A Financing; and Initial Public Offerings.Students who complete this course will have a strong foundational understanding of the principal non-technology transactions that arise around high-growth/start-up firms and how they are structured and documented. They will be able to think through the principal legal issues that are likely to arise and formulate strategies in response.

  • Law Team I 1.0

    One or more students will be paired with a lawyer and/or law firm with substantial experience in technology and high-growth corporate transactions. Students will work under the supervision of the lawyer and/or law firm in providing legal support to student and other project teams, including studio teams, that are assigned to it. Through the law team process, students will have an opportunity to practice what they learn in the classroom, as well as become familiar with a range of legal and regulatory issues (and solutions) relating to technology and high-growth corporate transactions.

  • Internet, Privacy, and Cybersecurity Law 3.0

    This is a survey course in Internet law, with particular emphasis on privacy and security. It is designed to teach lawyers what they need to know to work effectively with computer technologists, and vice versa. Topics covered may vary based on recent events, but will typically include jurisdiction, free speech, privacy, cybersecurity, e-commerce, digital property, intermediary liability and network neutrality. What unites these disparate areas of law is that, in each of them, computer and network technologies are challenging settled legal understandings in similar ways. We will explore these recurring patterns of legal disruption and predict how they will play out online and offline. Students who complete this course will be able to sort out the issues of a complex case to identify what’s really at stake, think through the likely legal implications of a new technology, and formulate successful legal strategies in the messy world of big data, strong encryption, copyright bots, anonymous jerks, and the Streisand Effect.

  • High-Growth Corporate Transactions II 2.0

    A continuation of High-Growth Corporate Transactions I. This course is designed to familiarize students with common issues that arise in startups, and how they are addressed by attorneys who structure high-growth (principally start-up) corporate transactions. It will address that portion of the transactional practice not covered in Technology Transactions. Going beyond the black letter law, it will draw on the expertise of lawyers and law firms with substantial experience in the area who will review the principal transactional documents in detail and how they address the principal issues that arise in high-growth corporate transactions. Although topics may be modified over each semester, a wide range of topics is expected to be covered, including: Choice of Entity; Founders’ Agreement(s); Terms of Preferred Stock, including Liquidation Preferences and Conversion Mechanics; Basic Deal Structuring; Tax Issues/Benefits for Entrepreneurs/Startups; Series A Financing; and Initial Public Offerings.Students who complete this course will have a strong foundational understanding of the principal non-technology transactions that arise around high-growth/start-up firms and how they are structured and documented. They will be able to think through the principal legal issues that are likely to arise and formulate strategies in response.

  • Employment Law 1.0

    This course covers the core laws surrounding hiring, managing, and firing workers, with a focus on small or high-tech businesses. Specific topics include the employee/independent contractor line in the gig economy, the employment-at-will rule, employee privacy, anti-discrimination laws, leave and benefits requirements, and protection of trade secrets and non–competition covenants.

  • Law Team II 1.5

Electives

Choose electives until semester total is reached.
  • Tech for Business 1.5

    This course provides introductions to selected topics in Computer and Information Science, such as Internet Architecture, Machine Learning, Cryptography, Social Networks and Startup Systems.

  • Business for Tech 1.0

    Business for Technologists (BT) is a comprehensive introduction to the key aspects of new product development and product management that will provide helpful perspective for technologists working in cross functional teams with business leaders in the marketing, product, finance, legal and business development disciplines. BT focuses both on concepts and frameworks utilizing “solutions architecture” while working on cross functional teams in both agile and waterfall development environments. Students will utilize their team projects as the basis to complete customer development, market segmentation, product placement, construct business models and define “proof points” and milestones that lead to successful outcomes for teams comprised of both technologists and subject matter experts from a broad array of business disciplines. The course will also discuss the development of an “intellectual property suite” and its importance in the new product development process and relevance to the competitive landscape. While the course focuses on scalable businesses, the principles apply to businesses of all sizes. Topics covered will include definition of the market, sales and distribution, competition, business development, project management and milestone based performance tracking. The course culminates in a capstone project of writing a launch plan for a new technology product’s market test.

  • Entrepreneurial Finance 1.5

    This course is about financing start-up firms. In it, students will analyze the financing decision of start-ups using the principles of corporate finance such as valuation, control of firms, and investment decisions with an eye towards developing these concepts in an entrepreneurial context. Students will do this through in-depth discussion of the concepts, applications through several cases, and a dialogue with practitioners. Students will analyze issues both from the perspective of the entrepreneur and that of the investors. As an entrepreneur it is important not only to know the ‘lingo’ but to also understand the principles behind it. This will allow students to better structure the capital of their future start ups and effectively negotiate with Angels, VCs and banks. Conversely, they cannot evaluate a potential investment opportunity without appreciating the entrepreneur’s perspective and incentives. Broadly speaking the course is divided into two topics: raising capital and exit strategies. As it stands now, students will discuss raising capital through equity (and its derivatives), and debt. In terms of exit strategies we will discuss exit through acquisition and through IPO.

  • Disruptive Technologies 1.0

    Begins by presenting historical technological advances that created major paradigm shifts for communications. Presents advances in computer technology emphasizing the fundamentals behind the increases in processing power, video and computer graphics capabilities, and network transmission. The second half of the course covers the effect of these scientific advances on many discipline-specific areas including photography, the film industry, the entertainment and animation industry, television broadcasting, publishing, and the computer industry itself. Sessions are devoted to the social and legal issues arising from the rapid advances in electronic communication. In attempting to predict the disruptive changes of the future, it is best to understand the technologies themselves. The course is especially tailored to a business school and industrial concerns and has interactive live demonstrations at the state-of-the-art laboratory of the Program of Computer Graphics. No prior knowledge of computer science is required.

Studio Interdisciplinary Curriculum

Practicums with other Cornell Tech Masters students.
  • Conversations in the Studio 1.0

    This course features a weekly guest practitioner for a provocative, closed-door discussion with students. The guest practitioners are active entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, social entrepreneurs, engineers, designers, artists, VCs, lawyers, writers, ethicists, and other diverse leaders who are affecting society through their entrepreneurial efforts. Conversations take place in the Cornell Tech Studio and are moderated each week by a randomly assigned group of students who come prepared with questions and discussion topics. This is not a lecture: it's a weekly wake-up call.

  • Startup Ideas 1.0

    This studio-based course helps students develop their ability to imagine, recognize, develop and improve startup ideas. In each class, students learn a different approach to product ideation or product critique, then practice that approach, working in many different teams -- often with the advice of visiting entrepreneurs, VCs, domain experts, and other practitioners. Students invent and explore hundreds of startup ideas, and help each other evaluate and improve those ideas. By the end of the course, students self-organize into co-founding teams around specific startup ideas that they will pursue in Startup Studio the following semester.

  • Product Studio 3.0

    In Product Studio you and a team of your classmates will respond to a "Company Challenge" by developing, testing, and presenting a new product or business idea. Previous challenges have been posed by organizations as diverse as the Robin Hood Foundation, Uber, Weight Watchers and Bloomberg.

  • Leadership for Studio 1.0

    This course deals broadly with leadership – of teams, projects, products, businesses, and communities. The course will pay special attention to leadership in the context of digital transformation and its social and economic impacts. Students will learn effective team-building and teamwork strategies, communication and presentation skills, and best practices for building a collaborative, creative and open culture in the workplace. As part of a personal development process, toolkits and exercises will be provided to promote critical thinking and moral reasoning skills. Sessions on social and multicultural awareness and sensitivity will equip students to be global leaders in a digitally-transformed world. In short, this course will cover all aspects of how students can become leaders in a digital economy.

  • Conversations in the Studio 1.0

    This course features a weekly guest practitioner for a provocative, closed-door discussion with students. The guest practitioners are active entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, social entrepreneurs, engineers, designers, artists, VCs, lawyers, writers, ethicists, and other diverse leaders who are affecting society through their entrepreneurial efforts. Conversations take place in the Cornell Tech Studio and are moderated each week by a randomly assigned group of students who come prepared with questions and discussion topics. This is not a lecture: it's a weekly wake-up call.

  • Product Management 1.0

    This studio-based course helps students learn about and develop product management (PM) skills by putting those abilities immediately to use on their Startup Studio projects. In each session, students learn about a different aspect of product management, product design, or technology development, then practice applying it to their Startup Studio projects, working in the Studio with their project teams and with the help and critique of the practitioner instructors and sometimes visiting practitioners. By the end of the semester, students will have developed and practiced many of the fundamental product management skills required to develop new technology products, and their Startup Studio projects will have greatly benefited from the practice.

  • Startup Studio 3.0

    In Startup Studio you and a team of your classmates will develop your own new product or startup idea. You'll experience the entire process, from developing your idea, to prototyping and testing, to pitching to investors. You can even apply for a Startup Award that will provide funding and other support to help you turn your Startup Studio project to a real business.

  • Leadership for Studio 1.0

    This course deals broadly with leadership – of teams, projects, products, businesses, and communities. The course will pay special attention to leadership in the context of digital transformation and its social and economic impacts. Students will learn effective team-building and teamwork strategies, communication and presentation skills, and best practices for building a collaborative, creative and open culture in the workplace. As part of a personal development process, toolkits and exercises will be provided to promote critical thinking and moral reasoning skills. Sessions on social and multicultural awareness and sensitivity will equip students to be global leaders in a digitally-transformed world. In short, this course will cover all aspects of how students can become leaders in a digital economy.

Open Studio

Show off your semester of studio work to industry insiders.

LEARN MORE

Program Courses

High-Growth Corporate Transactions II 2.0

A continuation of High-Growth Corporate Transactions I. This course is designed to familiarize students with common issues that arise in startups, and how they are addressed by attorneys who structure high-growth (principally start-up) corporate transactions. It will address that portion of the transactional practice not covered in Technology Transactions. Going beyond the black letter law, it will draw on the expertise of lawyers and law firms with substantial experience in the area who will review the principal transactional documents in detail and how they address the principal issues that arise in high-growth corporate transactions. Although topics may be modified over each semester, a wide range of topics is expected to be covered, including: Choice of Entity; Founders’ Agreement(s); Terms of Preferred Stock, including Liquidation Preferences and Conversion Mechanics; Basic Deal Structuring; Tax Issues/Benefits for Entrepreneurs/Startups; Series A Financing; and Initial Public Offerings.Students who complete this course will have a strong foundational understanding of the principal non-technology transactions that arise around high-growth/start-up firms and how they are structured and documented. They will be able to think through the principal legal issues that are likely to arise and formulate strategies in response.

Technology Transactions II 2.0

This course is designed to familiarize students with common issues that arise in technology transactions, and how they are addressed by attorneys who structure such transactions. Going beyond the black letter law, it will draw on the expertise of lawyers and law firms with substantial experience in the area who will review the principal transactional documents in detail and describe how they address the principal issues that arise in technology transactions. Although topics may be modified over each semester, a wide range of topics is expected to be covered, including: Formation Issues; Initiating a Technology Transaction; Common Transactions for Early Stage Companies; Patent Prosecution; Issues Arising in International Transactions; Technology in M&A Transactions; and Open Source Software.

Intellectual Property Law 3.0 LAW 6512

This is a survey course in intellectual property (IP) law. It covers the what, when, who, how, and why of IP: what kinds of information can be protected, when these rights arise, who owns them, how they are enforced, and why the legal system goes to all this trouble. We will perform comparative anatomy on bodies of law including trade secret, patent, copyright, trademark, false advertising, and rights of publicity, dissecting them to understand them on their own terms and in relationship to each other. Students will be able to understand how each field of IP thinks about the world, to identify what kinds of information are and are not covered by different types of IP, and to advise creators, innovators, entrepreneurs, and citizens how to deal with IP assets and threats in a wide variety of technological settings. Although this course is suitable for those who have not previously taken a course in IP, it will not be redundant for those who have. Our goal will be to understand the deep structure of intellectual property law, not to memorize doctrinal details or debate abstract points of legal theory.

High-Growth Corporate Transactions I 2.0 LAW 6470

This course is designed to familiarize students with common issues that arise in startups, and how they are addressed by attorneys who structure high-growth (principally start-up) corporate transactions. It will address that portion of the transactional practice not covered in Technology Transactions. Going beyond the black letter law, it will draw on the expertise of lawyers and law firms with substantial experience in the area who will review the principal transactional documents in detail and how they address the principal issues that arise in high-growth corporate transactions. Although topics may be modified over each semester, a wide range of topics is expected to be covered, including: Choice of Entity; Founders’ Agreement(s); Terms of Preferred Stock, including Liquidation Preferences and Conversion Mechanics; Basic Deal Structuring; Tax Issues/Benefits for Entrepreneurs/Startups; Series A Financing; and Initial Public Offerings.Students who complete this course will have a strong foundational understanding of the principal non-technology transactions that arise around high-growth/start-up firms and how they are structured and documented. They will be able to think through the principal legal issues that are likely to arise and formulate strategies in response.

Technology Transactions I 2.0 LAW 6893

This course is designed to familiarize students with common issues that arise in technology transactions, and how they are addressed by attorneys who structure such transactions. Going beyond the black letter law, it will draw on the expertise of lawyers and law firms with substantial experience in the area who will review the principal transactional documents in detail and describe how they address the principal issues that arise in technology transactions. Although topics may be modified over each semester, a wide range of topics is expected to be covered, including: Formation Issues; Initiating a Technology Transaction; Common Transactions for Early Stage Companies; Patent Prosecution; License Agreements; Technology in M&A Transactions; and Open Source Software. Students who complete this course will have a strong foundational understanding of the principal technology transactions and how they are structured and documented. They will be able to think through the principal legal issues that are likely to arise and formulate strategies in response.

Internet, Privacy, and Cybersecurity Law 3.0

This is a survey course in Internet law, with particular emphasis on privacy and security. It is designed to teach lawyers what they need to know to work effectively with computer technologists, and vice versa. Topics covered may vary based on recent events, but will typically include jurisdiction, free speech, privacy, cybersecurity, e-commerce, digital property, intermediary liability and network neutrality. What unites these disparate areas of law is that, in each of them, computer and network technologies are challenging settled legal understandings in similar ways. We will explore these recurring patterns of legal disruption and predict how they will play out online and offline. Students who complete this course will be able to sort out the issues of a complex case to identify what’s really at stake, think through the likely legal implications of a new technology, and formulate successful legal strategies in the messy world of big data, strong encryption, copyright bots, anonymous jerks, and the Streisand Effect.

Startup Studio 3.0 CS 5999

In Startup Studio you and a team of your classmates will develop your own new product or startup idea. You'll experience the entire process, from developing your idea, to prototyping and testing, to pitching to investors. You can even apply for a Startup Award that will provide funding and other support to help you turn your Startup Studio project to a real business.

Product Studio 3.0 CS 5999

In Product Studio you and a team of your classmates will respond to a "Company Challenge" by developing, testing, and presenting a new product or business idea. Previous challenges have been posed by organizations as diverse as the Robin Hood Foundation, Uber, Weight Watchers and Bloomberg.

Leadership for Studio 1.0 NBAY 6800

This course deals broadly with leadership – of teams, projects, products, businesses, and communities. The course will pay special attention to leadership in the context of digital transformation and its social and economic impacts. Students will learn effective team-building and teamwork strategies, communication and presentation skills, and best practices for building a collaborative, creative and open culture in the workplace. As part of a personal development process, toolkits and exercises will be provided to promote critical thinking and moral reasoning skills. Sessions on social and multicultural awareness and sensitivity will equip students to be global leaders in a digitally-transformed world. In short, this course will cover all aspects of how students can become leaders in a digital economy.