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The Johnson Cornell Tech MBA begins on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, New York with a ten-week intensive program of core business and leadership education.

On your 11th week, you will move to the New York City campus for two semesters of rigorous, interdisciplinary, innovative entrepreneurial courses. In the January between those two semesters, you and your classmates will travel to Israel to network and present business solutions to local startups.

In an educational innovation unique to Cornell Tech, you'll also participate in an immersive Studio experience, in which you'll develop your team-building and leadership skills while developing a new product idea in response to the strategic needs of a real organization and create your own startup.

Programs Courses

Agility I

NBAY 6320 1.00

Agility II

NBAY 6330 1.00

Business Models

NBAY 6570 1.50

Critical and Strategic Thinking

NCCY 5050 1.50

This course is designed to convey the key concepts of marketing and how they fit into the larger context of management strategy and decisions. Presents both the practical “how” and the fundamental “why” of marketing activities in the light of contributions from behavioral science, economics, and statistics. The goals are to provide sufficient understanding for those who need only to interact with the marketing function, as well as communication concepts and developing processes that can provide the foundation for further course work and future experience in marketing. The course makes extensive use of case materials.

Data Analytics & Modeling

NCCY 5010 2.50

This course provides the foundations of probability and statistics required for a manager to interpret large quantities of data and to make informed decisions under uncertainty. Topics covered include decision trees, sampling, hypothesis testing and multiple regression.

Designing Data Products

NBAY 6170 1.50

This course will help Johnson students to gain the necessary skills of building a data product. Many industries today are faced with high data volumes and there is an understanding that “data is the new gold”. But value is not created by data; rather, it is created by the application of data for a B2B or B2C need. To link the possibilities of data to business needs is a skill that is highly in demand in today’s business world. This course aims to fill the current skill gap by educating students with the basic data skills that are needed in order to guide an organization to become data-centric and potentially create data products. Classes will be a combination of lectures, discussions, and hands on training with data. The students will build their own predictive model, without the need to directly write code.

Digital Marketing

NBAY 6090 1.50

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts in digital marketing and prepares them for roles as marketers, entrepreneurs or product managers. Students will be exposed to an overview of the major players in the advertising and digital industries, as well as a variety of tools commonly found in start-ups and technology firms. Course material will be covered with a mixture of case studies, lectures and guest speakers.

Disruptive Technologies

NBAY 6120 1.00

Begins by presenting historical technological advances that created major paradigm shifts for communications. Presents advances in computer technology emphasizing the fundamentals behind the increases in processing power, video and computer graphics capabilities, and network transmission. The second half of the course covers the effect of these scientific advances on many discipline-specific areas including photography, the film industry, the entertainment and animation industry, television broadcasting, publishing, and the computer industry itself. Sessions are devoted to the social and legal issues arising from the rapid advances in electronic communication. In attempting to predict the disruptive changes of the future, it is best to understand the technologies themselves. The course is especially tailored to a business school and industrial concerns and has interactive live demonstrations at the state-of-the-art laboratory of the Program of Computer Graphics. No prior knowledge of computer science is required.

Entrepreneurial Finance

NBAY 5300 1.50

This course is about financing start-up firms. In it, students will analyze the financing decision of start-ups using the principles of corporate finance such as valuation, control of firms, and investment decisions with an eye towards developing these concepts in an entrepreneurial context. Students will do this through in-depth discussion of the concepts, applications through several cases, and a dialogue with practitioners. Students will analyze issues both from the perspective of the entrepreneur and that of the investors. As an entrepreneur it is important not only to know the ‘lingo’ but to also understand the principles behind it. This will allow students to better structure the capital of their future start ups and effectively negotiate with Angels, VCs and banks. Conversely, they cannot evaluate a potential investment opportunity without appreciating the entrepreneur’s perspective and incentives. Broadly speaking the course is divided into two topics: raising capital and exit strategies. As it stands now, students will discuss raising capital through equity (and its derivatives), and debt. In terms of exit strategies we will discuss exit through acquisition and through IPO.

Entrepreneurship in Creative Industries

NBAY 5770 1.00

Venture capitalist Arthur Rock once said, “I prefer to invest in companies that change the way we live and think.” This course is focused on strategies for creating and growing such companies: entrepreneurial leaders in the creative industries. Firms in creative industries play a role in every aspect of our lives, and influence many physical and psychological aspects of our lives, from what we eat and wear to how we entertain ourselves, but markets for cultural goods are complex and difficult to navigate. This course will examine why this is the case by shedding light on the underlying economic, social, and cultural rules and norms that govern the structure and functioning of these markets, in order to derive strategies and business models for entrepreneurial success. This course will analyze business cases of such market-pioneers in a wide range of creative industries such as art, fashion, film, food, music, publishing, and theater to explore and understand the economic, organizational, and sociological underpinnings of entrepreneurship, value(s), markets, and culture. The course may also interest students seeking to understand how firms offering radical innovations can create new markets by addressing the entire market ecosystem. The objective of the course is to help students understand how to effectively create, manage, or invest in firms that successfully compete in creative industries. Because the structure of creative industries is unique, the course takes an ecosystem-level perspective to understand how value is created in these industries. The goal is to help entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial managers formulate competitive strategies that enable radically innovative creative firms to thrive and stay culturally relevant in the long run.

Financial Accountings

NCCY 5000 2.50

Introductory accounting course that examines the subject from the viewpoint of users external to the organization. Topics include transaction analysis; the accounting cycle; financial-statement preparation, use, and analysis; revenue recognition and cost measurement; present value; and problems in financial-accounting disclosure.

International Entrepreneurship

1.00

Intro to Cases

1.00

Leading Teams

NCCY 5040 1.50

The goal of managers and leaders is to get things done in organizations, and most of that work is accomplished by effectively managing other people. This course applies cutting-edge behavioral science findings to develop your managerial and leadership capabilities. Getting things done through others far outweighs any technical skills a person might have — and there has been extensive research done on those topics. What has been missing, and what this course will emphasize, is how to translate those research findings into practical tools, changing how to do things next Monday. The course is designed to provide students with concepts and competencies to help them throughout their managerial careers. The concepts will include both time-tested ideas and very recent findings, putting students at the cutting edge of management thinking. But learning the lessons intellectually is the easy part. Students will also have the chance to practice and experiment with these ideas. Through class exercises, videotaped exercises and cases, they will have the opportunity to turn the concepts into competencies.

Macroeconomics & International Trade

NBAY 5240 1.00

The course introduces basic concepts and tools from macroeconomic theory, and discusses their application. Topics covered include, among others, economic growth, expansions and recessions, monetary and fiscal policies, GDP, inflation, unemployment, the public debt, interest rates, the trade deficit, and global markets. Although focusing on the U.S.—currently the world’s largest national economy—and paying special attention to its institutions and problems, the course will emphasize the global context in which it functions by periodically shifting attention to other economies around the world. Globalization-related issues such as international financial markets and international trade will be given special attention.

Management Presentations

NBAY 5681 1.50

Managerial Decision Making

NBAY 6630 1.00

This course has one overarching objective: to make its participants better decision makers through the provision of a framework for a good decision process. More specific objectives are (1) To understand the critical role of framing, so that participants are able to structure their decisions in the most useful way(s) and to see how coworkers, competitors and other stakeholders view the same decision situation. (2) To identify typical shortcomings in intuitive judgment and provide methods for overcoming these shortcomings. (3) To provide tools for managing group decisions.

Managerial Finance

NCCY 5060 2.50

This course introduces students to the basic concepts in finance, including the time value of money, the tradeoff between risk and return, and arbitrage. It is meant to give students a strong basis in finance that can be used in their professional careers as well as to provide the background necessary for more advanced finance classes. The topics we cover include how to move cash flows in time, the methods and principles of capital budgeting, valuation of bonds and stocks, how to characterize risk and return, and options pricing with applications to managerial decisions.

Managerial Reporting

NBAY 5020 1.50

The course examines the use of accounting information within organizations and for internal users. While some financial statement preparation topics are covered, the course emphasizes processes for using accounting information as a tool for decision-making. Topics include budgeting, product costing, activity-based costing, standard costs and variance analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis, performance measurement techniques and design, and transfer pricing. Instruction will be a mixture of lecture and case discussion. Student evaluation will be based on short problem sets, written case assignments, class participation, preliminary exams and a final exam.

Managerial Spreadsheet Modeling

NBAY 6430 1.00

This course will develop students’ proficiency in quantitative modeling within the environment of Microsoft Excel (good spreadsheet design, effective presentation of information through spreadsheets, including advanced Excel features). Another goal of the course is to extend student skills and understanding of advanced quantitative tools such as Solver optimization algorithms, Monte Carlo simulation, and decision analysis. The course is hands-on, and largely conduced in “lab” format. The primary deliverable is a term project on a topic of choice.

Marketing Management

NCCY 5030 2.50

This course is designed to convey the key concepts of marketing and how they fit into the larger context of management strategy and decisions. We will present both the practical “how” and the fundamental “why” of marketing activities in the light of contributions from behavioral science, economics, and statistics. The goals are to provide sufficient understanding for those who need only to interact with the marketing function, as well as communication concepts and developing processes that can provide the foundation for further course work and future experience in marketing. The course makes extensive use of case materials.

Microeconomics for Management

NCCY 5020 2.50

Introduces microeconomic theory and applies it to problems faced by managers. Topics include supply and demand, consumer behavior, pricing when a firm has market power and the role of contracts. The course employs a lecture format and emphasizes problem solving. Grading is based on quizzes, a midterm and a final exam.

Modeling & Analytics for Managers

NBAY 6670 1.00

The practice of business is changing. Due to increasing desktop computing power and huge amounts of data amassed by companies, business decisions are becoming increasingly based on data. This holds in many sectors, including Internet marketing and retailing where the only interaction with the customer is in digital form. While managers perform other tasks, their decision-making determines which enterprises flourish and prosper and which wither and die. It is very difficult to recover from bad decisions. This course aims at conveying some core principles of business analytics. This course is very hands-on and emphasis will be placed on solving real business cases, using real data via spreadsheet-enabled models. The objectives of this course are to try to help students improve modeling and data driven decision making and decision analysis skills, and to expose students, as future analysts/managers, to some of the new tools and ideas that will be helping make decisions in the twenty-first century.

Negotiations

NBAY 6660 2.50

We negotiate every day with prospective employers, teammates, roommates, landlords, service providers, and many others. What prices we want to pay, how much we want to be paid, how assignments will be divided and credit allocated… all of these are negotiations. Yet, while we negotiate routinely, many of us know very little about the strategy and psychology of effective negotiations. Why do we sometimes get our way while other times we walk away feeling frustrated by our inability to achieve the agreement we desire? Negotiation is the art and science of securing an agreement between two or more interdependent parties. The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiation as it is practiced in a variety of settings. It complements the technical and diagnostic skills students have learned in other courses at the Johnson School. The course is designed to help students approach negotiations with confidence. Students will have the opportunity to develop negotiating skills experientially and to gain insight into what works, what does not, and why.

Operations Management

NCCY 5080 2.50

This course focuses on managing processes: actions that convert inputs into outputs. Almost any business function can be modeled as a network of processes. The first part of the course examines processes, both individually and as part of a larger system; students see that good process design reflects both the volume and the variety of the product. A common course theme is the deleterious effect of variability (in demand, supply, quality, or capacity) in complex systems. Queuing theory and simulation are particularly helpful for analyzing process capabilities. The second part of the course analyzes how goods and services are produced. After describing the strategic role of operations, it examines forecasting systems, inventory management, and just-in-time and logistic management. Constrained optimization models provide information about managing with finite resources. The final part examines process improvement through quality and productivity management and corporate learning.

Sales and Business Development

NBAY 5640 1.00

This course will provide an overview of the principles and practices of direct sales and business development, leveraging research, practical and experiential resources. Classes will include instructor-driven content, expert practitioner guests, and experiential exercises. The course includes lectures, class discussions and exercises, guest lectures and reading assignments.

Social Entrepreneurship

NBAY 5100 1.50

The goal of this course to prepare students to lead companies that have embedded social missions and to engage various stakeholders at the nexus of business and social value. We will study leading social entrepreneurs and their companies, providing compelling examples that doing well and doing good can be inextricably linked by using the levers of business to achieve profit and social impact. We will explore a range of cases, from small start‐up organizations dealing with growth issues to more established firms that have successfully scaled their operations while maintaining a commitment to social mission.How can the goals of a company be articulated in and driven by the corporate mission? And, which goals are established by the market and which by the mission? Students will also wrestle with questions on the implementation and execution of social entrepreneurship.

Strategy

NCCY 5090 2.50

This courses introduces students to the basic concepts in finance, including the time value of money, the tradeoff between risk and return, and arbitrage. It is meant to give students a strong basis in finance that can be used in their professional careers as well as to provide the background necessary for more advanced finance classes. The topics we cover include how to move cash flows in time, the methods and principles of capital budgeting, valuation of bonds and stocks, how to characterize risk and return, and options pricing with applications to managerial decisions.

Tech for Business

NBAY 5400 1.50

This course provides introductions to selected topics in Computer and Information Science, such as Internet Architecture, Machine Learning, Cryptography, Social Networks and Startup Systems.

Valuation Principles

NBAY 6560 1.50

This course provides the fundamental concepts and tools to value assets and real investment projects using a financial-economic framework. Three approaches to valuation will be discussed throughout the course: 1) discounted cash flow (DCF); 2) valuation by multiples using comparable firms; and 3) realoptions. This course is especially useful to anyone preparing for a career role with input to project management, business investment including marketing and operations, and valuing entrepreneurial opportunities like startups. Both conceptual understanding and practical implementations through case studies will be emphasized.

iTrek

NBAY 5920 1.50

The Tech MBA program is notable for students’ proactive and practical learning experiences through projects and interactions with start-ups, large tech companies, and companies that implement disruptive technologies. The trek to Israel falls within this realm. The trek’s main objective is to engage students in an active and meaningful way with firms in the digital economy; to understand the challenges they face; to interact and experience working with people and startups from different culture; and to gain insight that will help students in their professional life. Leading up to the trek, students work in teams on a consulting project with an Israeli startup to help solve some of the challenges the firm faces. During the trek itself, students visit the companies and present their solution to the startup, others in the iTrek class, and outside guests such VCs, angel investors, and bankers.

iTrek Projects

NBAY 5900 1.50

The Tech MBA program is notable for students’ proactive and practical learning experiences through projects and interactions with start-ups, large tech companies, and companies that implement disruptive technologies. The trek to Israel falls within this realm. The trek’s main objective is to engage students in an active and meaningful way with firms in the digital economy; to understand the challenges they face; to interact and experience working with people and startups from different culture; and to gain insight that will help students in their professional life. Leading up to the trek, students work in teams on a consulting project with an Israeli startup to help solve some of the challenges the firm faces. During the trek itself, students visit the companies and present their solution to the startup, others in the iTrek class, and outside guests such VCs, angel investors, and bankers.

Studio & Interdisciplinary Courses

Conversations in the Studio

CS 5091 1.00

This course features a weekly guest practitioner for a provocative, closed-door discussion with students. The guest practitioners are active entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, social entrepreneurs, engineers, designers, artists, VCs, lawyers, writers, ethicists, and other diverse leaders who are affecting society through their entrepreneurial efforts. Conversations take place in the Cornell Tech Studio and are moderated each week by a randomly assigned group of students who come prepared with questions and discussion topics. This is not a lecture: it’s a weekly wake-up call.

Design Thinking

NBAY 5180 1.00

This hands-on course will prepare students to be future innovators by teaching Design Thinking, the human-centered design methodology pioneered by IDEO and Stanford d.school founder, David Kelley. Students will work on a team with peers from other disciplines so as to experience the importance of “radical collaboration.” All teams will work on the same challenge, and students will be asked to design an innovative solution to this complex problem.

HCI & Design

CS 5682 / INFO 6410 3.00

This course teaches Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and design theory and techniques. Methods for designing, prototyping, deploying and evaluating user interfaces to computing applications will be imparted, along with the basics of visual design, graphic design and interaction design. The class will also cover understanding human capabilities, interface technology, interface design methods, prototyping tools and interface evaluation tools and techniques.

Law for Non-Lawyers (for non-LLM students)

LAW 6673 1.00

This class introduces the principal legal issues involved in starting, managing and operating a technology-oriented business by entrepreneurs. It is intended to provide non-law students with an understanding of many of the laws and regulations to which developing businesses in the United States tech sector are typically subject—from the time an entrepreneur conceives and begins to build a business, implements a business plan, and obtains financing, to when she begins operations in anticipation of managing a mature company and considering possible exit strategies. The instructor, a former corporate partner in a large New York City law firm, will adopt the role of a general counsel to a start-up company advising his client/students about how laws and regulations affect their businesses at various stages of development, as well as about typical key contractual terms and negotiating strategies. Practicing lawyers will serve as guest lecturers. The course is designed to impart an understanding not only about substantive areas of the law that intersect with tech businesses but also about the role that lawyers should—and should not—play in burgeoning business enterprises. Students will gain insights into how lawyers approach business problems and the benefits and limitations of such a perspective.

Leadership for Studio

NBAY 6800 1.00

This course deals broadly with leadership – of teams, projects, products, businesses, and communities. The course will pay special attention to leadership in the context of digital transformation and its social and economic impacts. Students will learn effective team-building and teamwork strategies, communication and presentation skills, and best practices for building a collaborative, creative and open culture in the workplace. As part of a personal development process, toolkits and exercises will be provided to promote critical thinking and moral reasoning skills. Sessions on social and multicultural awareness and sensitivity will equip students to be global leaders in a digitally-transformed world. In short, this course will cover all aspects of how students can become leaders in a digital economy.

Product Management

CS 5093 1.00

This studio-based course helps students learn about and develop product management (PM) skills by putting those abilities immediately to use on their Startup Studio projects. In each session, students learn about a different aspect of product management, product design, or technology development, then practice applying it to their Startup Studio projects, working in the Studio with their project teams and with the help and critique of the practitioner instructors and sometimes visiting practitioners. By the end of the semester, students will have developed and practiced many of the fundamental product management skills required to develop new technology products, and their Startup Studio projects will have greatly benefited from the practice.

Product Studio (required)

CS 5999 3.00

In Product Studio you and a team of your classmates will respond to a “Company Challenge” by developing, testing, and presenting a new product or business idea. Previous challenges have been posed by organizations as diverse as the Robin Hood Foundation, Uber, Weight Watchers and Bloomberg.

Startup Ideas

CS 5092 1.00

This studio-based course helps students develop their ability to imagine, recognize, develop and improve startup ideas. In each class, students learn a different approach to product ideation or product critique, then practice that approach, working in many different teams — often with the advice of visiting entrepreneurs, VCs, domain experts, and other practitioners. Students invent and explore hundreds of startup ideas, and help each other evaluate and improve those ideas. By the end of the course, students self-organize into co-founding teams around specific startup ideas that they will pursue in Startup Studio the following semester.

Startup Studio (required)

CS 5999 3.00

In Startup Studio you and a team of your classmates will develop your own new product or startup idea. You’ll experience the entire process, from developing your idea, to prototyping and testing, to pitching to investors. You can even apply for a Startup Award that will provide funding and other support to help you turn your Startup Studio project to a real business.

Tech for Business

NBAY 5400 1.50

This course provides introductions to selected topics in Computer and Information Science, such as Internet Architecture, Machine Learning, Cryptography, Social Networks and Startup Systems.