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The Johnson Cornell Tech MBA begins on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, New York with a thirteen-week intensive program of core business and leadership education. You’ll take courses offered to all Johnson One-Year MBA students, as well as required courses offered only to your cohort in the Johnson Cornell Tech MBA.

After a two-week break, you will move to the New York City campus for two semesters of rigorous, interdisciplinary, innovative entrepreneurial courses. In the January between those two semesters, you and your cohort will have the opportunity to travel to Israel to network and present business solutions to local startups.

In an educational innovation unique to Cornell Tech, you'll also participate in the immersive Cornell Tech Studio experience, in which you'll develop a new product idea for a real company challenge and/or create your own startup.

Past Program Courses

This listing represents courses that have been offered as part of the program in prior years.  Specific courses are subject to change and may not be available every year. To see what is being offered in the current year, please refer to the Cornell University Class Roster.

Johnson Core Courses

Critical and Strategic Thinking

This course is designed to convey the key concepts of marketing and how they fit into the larger context of management strategy and decisions. Presents both the practical “how” and the fundamental “why” of marketing activities in the light of contributions from behavioral science, economics, and statistics. The goals are to provide sufficient understanding for those who need only to interact with the marketing function, as well as communication concepts and developing processes that can provide the foundation for further course work and future experience in marketing. The course makes extensive use of case materials.

Data Analytics & Modeling

This course provides the foundations of probability and statistics required for a manager to interpret large quantities of data and to make informed decisions under uncertainty. Topics covered include decision trees, sampling, hypothesis testing and multiple regression.

Financial Accounting

Introductory accounting course that examines the subject from the viewpoint of users external to the organization. Topics include transaction analysis; the accounting cycle; financial-statement preparation, use, and analysis; revenue recognition and cost measurement; present value; and problems in financial-accounting disclosure.

Leading Teams

The goal of managers and leaders is to get things done in organizations, and most of that work is accomplished by effectively managing other people. This course applies cutting-edge behavioral science findings to develop your managerial and leadership capabilities. Getting things done through others far outweighs any technical skills a person might have -- and there has been extensive research done on those topics. What has been missing, and what this course will emphasize, is how to translate those research findings into practical tools, changing how to do things next Monday. The course is designed to provide students with concepts and competencies to help them throughout their managerial careers. The concepts will include both time-tested ideas and very recent findings, putting students at the cutting edge of management thinking. But learning the lessons intellectually is the easy part. Students will also have the chance to practice and experiment with these ideas. Through class exercises, videotaped exercises and cases, they will have the opportunity to turn the concepts into competencies.

Managerial Finance

This course introduces students to the basic concepts in finance, including the time value of money, the tradeoff between risk and return, and arbitrage. It is meant to give students a strong basis in finance that can be used in their professional careers as well as to provide the background necessary for more advanced finance classes. The topics we cover include how to move cash flows in time, the methods and principles of capital budgeting, valuation of bonds and stocks, how to characterize risk and return, and options pricing with applications to managerial decisions.

Marketing Management

This course is designed to convey the key concepts of marketing and how they fit into the larger context of management strategy and decisions. We will present both the practical “how” and the fundamental “why” of marketing activities in the light of contributions from behavioral science, economics, and statistics. The goals are to provide sufficient understanding for those who need only to interact with the marketing function, as well as communication concepts and developing processes that can provide the foundation for further course work and future experience in marketing. The course makes extensive use of case materials.

Microeconomics for Management

Introduces microeconomic theory and applies it to problems faced by managers. Topics include supply and demand, consumer behavior, pricing when a firm has market power and the role of contracts. The course employs a lecture format and emphasizes problem solving. Grading is based on quizzes, a midterm and a final exam.

Operations Management

Focuses on managing processes: actions that convert inputs into outputs. Almost any business function can be modeled as a network of processes. The first part of the course examines processes, both individually and as part of a larger system; students see that good process design reflects both the volume and the variety of the product. A common course theme is the deleterious effect of variability (in demand, supply, quality, or capacity) in complex systems. Queuing theory and simulation are particularly helpful for analyzing process capabilities. The second part analyzes how goods and services are produced. After describing the strategic role of operations, it examines forecasting systems, inventory management, and just-in-time and logistic management. Constrained optimization models provide information about managing with finite resources. The final part examines process improvement through quality and productivity management and corporate learning.

Strategy

Among the critical tasks facing any senior manager are the creation, implementation, and evaluation of a business unit's strategy. This course seeks to provide the management student with the tools and frameworks essential to carrying out these tasks. Many of these tools and frameworks are based on recent advances in game theory, industrial organization, and organization theory, although the course also draws from the older business policy tradition. Students who successfully complete this course are able to analyze industries, identify areas of strategy advantage and disadvantage, and devise strategies that exploit advantages and remedy disadvantages.

Required Johnson Cornell Tech MBA Courses

Digital Marketing

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts in digital marketing and prepares them for roles as a marketer, entrepreneur or product manager. Students will be exposed to an overview of the major players in the advertising and digital industries, as well as a variety of tools commonly found in start-ups and technology firms. Course material will be covered with a mixture of case studies, lectures, and guest speakers.

Entrepreneurial Finance

This course is designed to introduce students to the challenges and pitfalls of financing new enterprises. The class sessions will combine lectures and cases. The course covers three broad topics: Identifying and valuing opportunities, contract design and financing alternatives, and exit/harvesting strategies.

Fundamentals of Modern Software

This course provides introductions to selected topics in Computer and Information Science, such as Internet Architecture, Machine Learning, Cryptography, Social Networks and Startup Systems.

Cornell Tech Studio Courses

Please see the Studio Curriculum for more details.

BigCo Studio

Successfully innovating inside of a large company takes a new set of skills. In BigCo Studio, you will learn how to build products in a complex environment at scale and navigate business development, M&A, and other corporate activities to drive strategic initiatives within large companies. Working in teams, you’ll be matched with a C-suite or VP advisor from a real BigCo to research, prototype, and present a new product that helps the company achieve its mission.

Product Studio

Product Studio is the foundational studio course for product development at Cornell Tech. Students form semester-long teams and select a "How Might We" question posed by a company. During the semester students learn the basics of product development so they can apply the knowledge and skills from their degree program: identifying impactful problems to solve, product ideation and design, development process, and constructing a meaningful product narrative and complete product loop. Students present their working product, narrative, and thought process four times during the semester, after completing each of three 24-hour "studio sprints" where they will focus on developing their product and a final product presentation at the end of the semester.

Startup Studio

In Startup Studio you and a team of your classmates will develop your own new product or startup idea. You'll experience the entire process, from developing your idea, to prototyping and testing, to pitching to investors. You can even apply for a Startup Award that will provide funding and other support to help you turn your Startup Studio project to a real business.

Sample General Electives

Select from additional courses offered on the Cornell Tech campus subject to availability, instructor approval and/or meeting prerequisites or other courses/program requirements. Please see the Class Roster for more details.

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